Sunset

First place photograph by Tim Robson

Bush Tip No.4

Investigate the alarm calls of guinea fowl as they will often point to a Serval or leopard nearby in the grass

 
click on images to enlarge

Lake Eyasi

Hot and dry, the Lake Eyasi area is located on the floor of the Rift Valley. An escarpment rises to the north into the Ngorongoro Conservation Area while a salt or “soda” lake lies on the valley floor. The region is especially suited to exploring on foot and we do this with our local guides.

Itís here that the Wahudzabe tribe lives. This dwindling population of hunter-gatherers still maintain their thousand year old traditions, albeit with great difficulty. Their language contains clicks, only one of two such linguistic patterns in Tanzania and while there are few similarities between the two, itís likely there is a connection between Ki-hadzabe and the San or bushman language of southern Africa.

A visit to this unique tribe is an interesting learning experience and we can spend the day observing their ways. We can set up our own camp in the area or make use of a permanent tented camp.

Expect to experience:

  • The Wahudzabe hunter gatherers still living a very traditional life style.
  • Stone age archaeological sites.
  • Stunning views of the Eyasi rift.
  • Vast numbers of water birds on the lake and surrounding springs and rivers.

Facts at a glance

  • The southwest flank of Ngorongoro Volcano drains into the northeast end of Lake Eyasi.
  • The Hadzabe ethnic group, a surviving relic of the hunter-gatherers on the African continent, could become extinct in a few years as a result of pressure on their natural habitat.

Accommodation

Kisima Ngeda Camp on the edge of a spring at Lake Eyasi
Kisima Ngeda Camp on the edge of a spring at Lake Eyasi

Bush breakfast on a sand river
Bush breakfast on a sand river

Hippo viewing in the green season from the lawn at Kisima Ngeda camp
Hippo viewing in the green season from the lawn at Kisima Ngeda camp